Thursday, 11 January 2018

Bad Dog Combat Armour Suit Doctrine



At the moment it doesn't make much sense to build walking tanks, but in a science fiction novel I can make suppositions about the future. In the world of Bad Dog warfare has changed from the introduction of robotic combat vehicles, which dominate the battlefield. This YouTube video gives you an idea of the size of the combat armour suits I imagined for my novel Bad Dog.

And yes, I am a VOTOMS fan girl.

However, combat armour suits raise questions around doctrine, which is all about defining how the stuff the military has is used, and new equipment drive changes.

The military loves its clunky abbreviations, DOTMILPF-P spectrum being one of the longer ones I've come across while researching stuff for my novels and this piece. It stands for:
Doctrine, Organization, Training, Materiel, Leadership and Education, Personnel, Facilities, and Policy.
Phew, what a mouthful, and that's not something I say often.

In peace time, budgets for acquiring new technology drive the development of military doctrine. In war time the drive comes from countering the enemy's forces, but either way, doctrine seeks to provide a common conceptual framework for a military service by asking the following questions:
Who are we? How the Army, Navy, Air Force service perceives itself to be?
What do they do? What mission are they being called to carry out?
How do they do what they are being asked to do? How the mission is to carried out?
How did we do they do it in the past? How the mission has been carried out in history?
And of course, doctrine will also answer other things not covered by the above questions.
So, doctrine is neither operations nor tactics. Instead, it serves as a conceptual framework uniting all three levels of warfare covering operational, strategic, and tactical issues. These each have the following defined:
The fundamental principles.
Tactics, techniques, and procedures.
Terms and symbols.
Doctrine provides a guideline to the activities a unit undertakes, the actions expected of it, and describes how things are done, but does not prescribe what must be done. Which is a long preamble describing the process when one is creating a new type of unit for the military to use.

In this case, the questions that would have to be answered if combat armour suits were brought into service.

All rather dry reading. So let me leave you with this...

   
     

2 comments:

  1. DOTMILPF-P are DLODs - defence lines of development.

    In the UK we don't use that hamfisted mess, we use TEPIDOIL (mostly the sam words, E is Equipment). You can rearrange this though to DIEPILOT and hack off the crabs :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Useful to know.

      How's your knowledge on Russian Federation practice?

      Looking for help for a Russian story.

      Delete

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