Saturday, 9 January 2016

Archery


I'm shooting 16lbs, which is way low, but I'm a beginner, hence the angle to reach the butt that was set at 40 yards.  I had to contend with resetting the sight twice, which changes the angle of the bow, and having to cope with four arrows with bad fletchings (including two where the fletches fell off as I fired), but my new GapFit wicking top kept me warm on the field (11 degrees C).  My hand needs to be under my chin, which is why I was having difficulty making the range.

No this is not me doing a new period as such, though I suppose at a stretch it could be considered 1:1 scale live action, but me noodling on about my archery lessons.

I've just completed week four, though I've been five times one of the classes was cancelled due to high winds, and I have another two training sessions to finish before I can become a member of the Greenwood Osterley Archers Club.  I still have a long way to go before I'm anything like competent, but hopefully, I will be classified as safe to practice when I finish my course, which will happen as long as I don't do anything egregious.

So, my observations on shooting arrows.

Wind is a thing.  Movement of the target would be even more of a thing, and if I ever do a wargame with archers I shall be taking a long, hard look at the assumptions of the rules, because while historical records are a great resources there's a practical difference between maximum range and maximum effective range.  In short archery is either mass fire for area effect or close in (under a hundred yards) direct fire shooting, and the two are not the same.
  

12 comments:

  1. Glad to see that you have been able to get some shooting (not firing!!!) in Ashley. When you have shot in woods, on uneven ground etc, you realise why it is so hard to hit anything other than with massed shooting. Unless the arrows are coming directly at you, it is quite easy to watch them in flight and then take evasive/defensive action, unless there are thousands of the buggers;)

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  2. Good luck with the archery! I'm about to resume shooting after a 3 year break...not sure a wet, windy January is the best time to get back into it though! I ended up shooting barebow as I got very frustrated trying to juggle sights, rods etc...it's not quite longbow but does give you a feeling for what it's like trying to pick off a target at 60 yards with not sights or reference points.

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    1. Of course the smart Alec answer is that it's always a good time to start shooting. ;-)

      I feel your pain about the juggling the sights, but I'm seeing it as a chance to learn a new skill set. As for the rods to balance things etc, I can't see myself going down that route. Like you I'd rather shoot bare bow.

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    2. I think it's worth learning with sights etc and getting the 'basics' worked out...then you can decided which bits to keep or discard...good luck!

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  3. Archery, I used to do that and it was fun. However, it's a lot more fun inside. Still at least the combats and the boots still have a use.

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    1. They sure do, but some clubs are not so relaxed about apparel and competitions are a whole different ball game, so to speak.

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  4. Congrats on the new hobby! I'll expect a full write up and critique of wargaming indirect fire rules in 8-12 months then... :)

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  5. Dear Ashley,

    Supporting your comments about range: It is worth noting that even modern firearms produce the most hits at 50-100m range under actual battle conditions, well inside their theoretical effective ranges.

    Regards Chris.

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    1. Thanks for the comment Chris. Most appreciated.

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